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Masonry Veneer Siding & Cladding

 

Masonry Veneers are usually brick, block or stone.

Veneers are applied one ply thick either as a whole house veneer or as an accent veneer. Veneers are applied from the ground up and are attached to the wall sheathing with brick ties.

Veneers allow moisture to escape through weep holes underneath the bottom course of the siding.

Masonry veneers may be mortarless brick veneers. These are made of high strength tongue and groove concrete.

Most Suited To:

Popular in the South and Midwest and wherever tornadoes or hurricanes occur. Good supplementary architectural element to accent primary siding material.

Cost:

Mortarless brick can be installed about 35% faster than conventional masonry.

Benefits:

Masonry is especially pest, fire and impact-resistant.

Maintains a quality appearance.

An excellent rain screening siding; water cannot penetrate the veneer.

Considerations:

As with fiber cement, masonry is subject to freeze-thaw damage. Brick and stone veneers may develop spalling; the brick or stone or mortar may fall out or crumble. This mostly occurs where wall meets wall or at the bottom of the wall.

Finishing:

Use a high-quality acrylic or silicone sealer to prevent freeze-thaw damage in cold climates.

Maintenance:

Generally requires the least maintenance. Mortar used at joints might need to be restored over time; especially in a salty ocean environment.

Spalling can be slowed by ensuring debris remains clear from underneath the lowest course of the veneer.

Maintain weep holes under the bottom course to allow moisture to escape from behind the veneer.

Keep vines off siding. Vines weaked mortar and trap moisture next to the house.

If cracks or spalling occurs it should be patched or replaced as soon as possible.

Options:

Mortar or mortarless. Mortarless brick will not have the problems that a brick and mortar siding does.

Installation:

Tied to framework using brick ties that allow or expansion and contraction. This prevents the veneer from cracking.

L-shaped metal flashings are also used underneath the brick and up the wall to keep water from the foundation.

   

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